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Books!

Books by Martin Cohen

Links go to pages on this blog which give an ‘author’s perspective’ on the book

101 Philosophy Problems (1999, 2001, 2007 2013)

101 Ethical Dilemmas
(2002, 2007)

No Holiday: 80 places you DON'T want to visit
(2005)

Wittgenstein's Beetle and Other Classic Thought Experiments
(2004)

Political Philosophy from Plato to Mao
(2001, 2008)

Adam Smith: The Wealth of Nations
(2000)

The Essentials of Philosophy and Ethics
(2006)

Philosophical Tales
(2008)

Philosophy for Dummies
(UK edition, pub. 2010))

Critical Thinking Skills for Dummies
(2015)

Mind Games: 31 Days to Rediscover Your Mind
(2010)

The Doomsday Machine: The High Price of Nuclear Energy, The World's Most Dangerous Fuel
(2012, co-authored with Andrew McKillop)

How to Live: Wise (and not-so-wise) Advice from the Philosophers on Everyday Life
(2014)

Paradigm Shift: How Expert Opinions Keep Changing on Life, the Universe and Everything
(2015) Click here for my interview with Richard House for Self and Society)

Cracking Philosophy
(2016) Also known in some editions as The Philosophy Bible. Anyway, click here for a tiny taste…

Philosophy Hacks
(2017)

I Think Therefore I Eat
(2018)

The Leader's Bookshelf (2020)

Rethinking Thinking (2022)

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My three ‘calming’ audiobooks are at Audible... but check local sites


Popular posts from this blog

Playing Mind Games

This is also one of my favorite books, with another wonderful cover by Zolumio (also artist for 101 Philosophy Problems edition 3 and 101 Ethical Dilemmas Edition 2) , and although it didn't have quite the impact of the 101s, it does nonetheless have a very enthusiastic and dare I say, select following across numerous international editions. Indeed, it was translated into French (the French are very picky about ‘their’ philosophy books) and featured on their much-admired station, France Culture. (French speakers can enjoy the show  here . ) The point about Mind Games , and hey, does the title give a clue or does it just sound like the Joh Lennon song? is that it is about how the mind works, and this is a very interesting area and particularly so when approached non-technically and with a philosophical spirit of openness to ‘possibilities’. This is thus, philosophy but with a very different set of experts along with some of the usual philosophical names. There's Fre

Puzzling over Philosophy Problems

When it first came out way back in the last century (sighs) 101 Philosophy Problems was quite an iconoclast. Up to then, the most radical book of philosophy was Bertrand’s Problems of Philosophy , and that book splits the problems into boring categories like logic and epistemology ... So I knew, as a young(ish) philosophy teacher, there was room for a new look at the subject, and 101 PP was it. In time it went on to  sell (I think) about 250 000 copies in about 20 languages. I don’t know for sure as the publisher, Routledge, seemed to think it was a bit vulgar to keep track of things such as sales figures, although they gave me a nice lunch in London! Here's a taste of the book, a problem that up to then had been summed up as a  landmark philosophical problem concerning our understanding of descriptive knowledge situated somewhere the field of epistemology ... but I reinvented as simply the Problem of the Cow in the Field: Farmer Field is concerned about his prize co

Chewing over FOOD!

Readers who know my strong slant towards FRUIT AND VEG in I Think Therefore I Eat, will maybe be puzzled to find me taking on the vegans recently. Nonetheless, that is where I felt the truth of the extraordinarily complex food arguments lies and philosophy takes us where the truth is whether we like it or not! The Observer (London) even accused me of waging ‘culture wars’ and wondered: Is it possible that a combination of well-meaning philanthropists and large agricultural concerns have united to exploit health fears for financial gain, while neglecting the nutritional shortcomings in their recommendations? Anyway, in the event I was delighted to work with the brilliant Frédéric Leroy on this article, which basically follows up a request he received from the influential European Food Agency to raise public awareness about the complexity of food issues and the implicatons of simple ‘one size fits all’ solutions. Our piece kicked off a public information campaign which i