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Cracking philosophy

If you've got a coffee table, then this book needs to be on it. Honestly, it is the ideal ‘dip in and dip out’ way to read about philosophy, and pass a few moments in peaceful contemplation.

Anyway, here I am back in my ‘comfort zone’ expounding on the history of philosophy. Naturally, as anyone who knows me, my take on the mother of sciences is not exactly the same as you will get in other guides, and all the better for that!

The thing that makes this book remarkable, though, even given my (ahem) remarkable views, is the glorious, full color illustrations. There's a fine renaissance image to give the flavour from the section on Saint Augustine which points out, characteristically, that he considered babies to be born... evil! - and numerous glimpses from the famous image by Raphael of ALL the philosophers (past and present but not alas future) called ‘The School of Athens’.

Anyway, as I say, if you want an introduction to philosophical ideas, this is a gentle way to do it.

Raphael’s view of Pythagoras

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